Archive | May, 2013

The 1790’s – a Fascination

28 May

As a history buff I am interested in particular eras and periods in history, more specifically society, culture, politics, and fashion from these different eras. I am rather fascinated by the 1790’s, primarily the years between 1790 and 1795, but also reaching to 1799 and to the early 1800’s.

Events / philosophies / fashions / socio-cultural aspects

The French Revolution
– The politics
– The concept of Liberty, Fraternity and Equality
– The concept of a republic
– Revolutionary and Republic symbolism – red, white and blue tricolor flag & cockade, Phrygian cap, Liberty, nature etc
– Removing the importance of the church and Christian beliefs and replacing these with more classical and nature based beliefs and forms of worship
– The role of women in the revolution including female revolutionaries advocating the rights of women and women actively fighting in the revolution
– The revolutionary calendar
– Revolutionary fashion, including the use of red, white and blue ribbons (showing support for the revolution / republic) and the rejection of symbols of the ancien regime such as elaborate dress and hairstyles and emphasis on more classical and natural lines and hairstyles,

Feminism / Feminist Thought / Advocacy of the Rights of Women

Cross Dressing Women / Female Soldiers

Lesbian Sexuality / Romantic Friendships

Female Novelists
I am interested in the female novelists of the time, and the fact that writing and publishing novels was an accepted (if marginally) pursuit for women
– Female Writers & Novelists – Mary Wollenstencraft, Jane Austen, Fanny Burney, Anne Radcliffe
– Gothic novels and the gothic / horror / heroines that characterised this gene – almost contrasting to the image of gentility and domestic worlds written about by Jane Austen (except in Northanger Abbey which is a sort of parody of gothic novels)

European Women in India

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18th & 19th Century Historical & Fictional Women – Inspiration for My Novel Characters

28 May

Eliza de Feuillide – Jane Austen’s cousin / sister in law, raised in India, married to French aristocrat murdered in the French Revolution

Philadelphia Austen – Jane Austen’s aunt – I know very little of her life, but the anecdote (from a book on Jane Austen) that she was sent to India as a young woman to find a husband struck a cord with me – the practise of sending young women to find a husband to a far away exotic land seemed exotic, exciting and indeed comodifying of women

Anne Lister – English gentlewoman and diarist – famous for her coded diaries depicting her affairs with women

Olympe de Gorges – French Revolutionary and advocate for the rights of women. Executed in the Reign of Terror

Theroigne de Mericourt – French Revolutionary, female militant and advocate for the rights of women. She was known for wearing a man’s riding habit and a belt of pistols at her waist

Mary Wollstonecraft – English philosopher, advocate for the rights of women and novelist. Famous for response to the French Revolution’s Declaration of the the Rights of Man, her radical beliefs, unconventional love life (she passionately loved a female friend, had an affair with a married man and bore a child outside of marriage) and being Mary Shelley’s mother

Martinette de Beauvais from the novel Ormond by Charles Brockden Brown – A soldier, Republican who fought in both the American and French Revolution who wears men’s clothes and enjoys the life and freedom of a soldier. The subject of same sex feelings

Marguerite St Just / Blakeney from the Scarlet Pimpernel series by Baroness Orcy – French Republican and actress married to the Scarlet Pimpernel (the saviour of aristocrats and royalists from the guillotine). Passionate, loyal, sassy

Charlotte Corday – French Revolutionary who stabbed radical revolutionary Jean-Paul Marat in his bath tub. She was executed during the Reign of Terror

20130528-180614.jpg Marguerite Blakeney

A Talk with Merle Thornton – An Australian Feminist Legend!

23 May

As part of Diversity Week (a celebration of different cultures, art and issues) at the large university I work at, I had a wonderful opportunity to listen to a talk given by a famous Australian feminist and activist, Merle Thornton.

Merle came along to discuss her involvement in the establishment of the gender studies (at the time ‘women’s studies’) major at the university in 1973, the first of its kind in Australia. She also spoke about her life story, particularly her early career in the male dominated public service in the 1950’s and 1960’s, and significantly her famous and influential activist activities. Merle and Rosalie Bogner changed themselves to the public bar in the Regatta Hotel (a famous historic pub in Brisbane, Queensland) in 1965 in protest of the law banning women from public bars. As Merle said today, these were not men’s bars or private bars, these were public bars, and women were not allowed in these areas, let alone have a drink. Following this Merle was appointed president of a newly established feminist group and tackled another massive issue, a law requiring female public servants to resign when they married. Merle said it took eighteen months, but they won with a law passed in parliament amending the act and also introducing maternity leave.

She is such an inspirational female activist and I feel privileged that I had a chance to hear her talk in person. The protest at the Regatta Hotel basically started the women’s liberation movement in Brisbane (Trove – National Library of Australia). As the National Library describes it, a defining moment in the feminist movement in Australia.

References –
http://trove.nla.gov.au/people/765073?c=people
http://www.uq.edu.au/news/?article=22774

20130523-183930.jpg (Source – Queensland Department of Communities – http://www.communities.qld.gov.au/q150-women/1960/index.shtml#item-public-bars)

Asperwomen – Thoughts

23 May

After posting Asperwomen: Adult Women with Asperger Syndrome. Moving towards a female profile of Asperger Syndrome, a reblog of a post from taniaannmarshall’s blog, along with my comments including my personal experiences, I wondered if I had revealed too much. Had I said too much about the similarity of my traits and experiences to those exhibited and experienced by women diagnosed with Asperger’s Syndrome? I certainly did not wish to diminish those who had been diagnosed, I was discussing my own experience. I had revealed a lot. But it did feel a little affirming and in a way an embracing of these traits. Perhaps writing from the perspective that I did, I expressed it in a way that normalised these traits and didn’t make it a point of negative difference. Perhaps also it is the way that traits are perceived that changes whether these traits are positive or negative. For example, the ability to absorb great amounts of information and the thirst for knowledge. These traits can definitely be seen as good and positive, especially in an academic / education environment.

Asperwomen: Adult Women with Asperger Syndrome. Moving towards a female profile of Asperger Syndrome

23 May

An informative list of traits associated with Asperger’s Syndrome in women. Below, are my comments (and personal experience) I posted.

Thanks for a really informative list of traits / characteristics of Asperger’s Syndrome in women. I have not been diagnosed, and I don’t know if I would be diagnosed, but many of the traits describe how I work, see things and react emotionally. Definitely intense interests, good long term memory, perfectionism, emotionally aware and vulnerable to other’s emotions, feeling different to others applies to me. When I was younger (in primary and high school) I certainly felt different to others and I wanted to be like more “popular” people and I strived for that, but could never get there. I had my special interests and friends that were like minded so that helped. When I got to university I felt less pressured to be like others and I felt more comfortable with the feeling of being different. During postgraduate studies, I started to find myself – I embraced alternative music, lifestyles and fashions and I felt like I belonged, especially amongst a loosely collected group of people who celebrated their difference to the mainstream and made the point that they were different to others. I became alot more extroverted and socialised more. It was like I went through the stereotypical teenage years in my early twenties. During doctoral studies I travelled overseas. Being in a foreign city without family, friends and people who knew me, was a watershed experience, I shed something then. Back in my home country, over the next few years I went through great emotional turmoil, but I realised and discovered my same sex attraction (which had started with my fascination with an actress in a TV cop show in that foreign city). I eventually came out and I feel now, a few years later and a six year relationship, that I know who I am, and why I am different, but also I feel I can relate to a lot more people. While coming out (and going through depression / anxiety and chronic fatigue), a counsellor mentioned Asperger’s Syndrome to me. She said that many of the things I described fitted the traits / symptoms of this syndrome. Perhaps I was going through a transition stage where I was “overcoming” these Asperger’s traits and my personality and the way I saw things was changing. Thank you for a great article, and inspiring me to write about my experience.

Tania A. Marshall, M.Sc.

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Updated June 1st, 2017

Tania Marshall© 2013-2017. All rights reserved. Aspiengirl and Planet Aspien are trademarked. Thank you.

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p style=”text-align:center;”>Aspienwomen : Adult Women with Asperger Syndrome. Moving towards a female profile of Asperger Syndrome. This blog has been viewed almost 350,000 times since I initially wrote it and was the inspiration for my second book, released August 29th, 2015, Foreword by Dr. Shana Nichols. and now an international best seller. I am pleased to announce this book just received a 2016 IPPY eLit Gold Medal award in the ‘Women’s Issues’ category. This book is available at http://www.aspiengirl.com, Amazon, the Australian Council for Educational Research (ACER) and other fine book stores.

Tania is available for fee-based in-person or Skype remote assessments, consultations, problem solving sessions, intervention and support. She also works regularly with a variety of professionals in many countries, in the areas of referrals and assisting individuals to obtain and/or…

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Current Topics of Interest Continued

22 May

To add to my earlier list of current topics of interest, today I found myself interested in Asperger’s Syndrome, an Autistic Spectrum Disorders. I browsed a couple of journal papers, including one that looked at specific traits in individuals diagnosed with Asperger’s, scientists, college students and a control group comprising women and men. I am also rather intrigued about the experience of women diagnosed with Asperger’s Syndrome, so I am going to find a few papers on this as well.

Paper –
Baron-Cohen, S., Wheelwright, S., Skinner, R., Martin, J. and Clubley, E. (2001) The Autism-Spectrum Quotient (AQ):Evidence from Asperger Syndrome/High-Functioning Autism,Males and Females,Scientists and Mathematicians Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders 31:1

Current Topics of Interest

22 May

These are a few topics of interest that I am currently reading about and researching for a couple of novels / stories I am working on.

– Same-sex love between women and romantic friendships in the 18th and early 19th centuries
– Novelists (female and male) that wrote about the above
– Cross Dressing women in the 18th century, particularly those that joined the military
– The Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars in relation to British and French relations in India

– Equality and women’s rights in 1930’s in the USSR
– British and French women and men who travelled (and moved to) the USSR in the 1930’s

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