Archive | Burlesque RSS feed for this section

Bookfest

9 May

I visited the Alumni Bookfest at the university I work at yesterday to have a browse and search for books on the French Revolution. I didn’t have much luck in regards to books on the French Revolution, but I was rather pleased to pick up three books for $2.50. I found a paperback version of Rita Hayworth’s biography which I read years ago for 50c. That was rather awesome. Rita is one of my favourite actresses. I also picked up for 50c a 1967 book on tips and moves in Striptease!! Now that I thought was very cool – a piece of history (the picture on the cover is very 60’s) and on something I want to learn more about (I’m really interested in burlesque). And to top it all off for $2 I bought a book I had been wanting to read for ages – ‘Odd Girls and Twilight Lovers’ by Lillian Faderman, which is a history of lesbian life in the USA in the 20th century (up to the early 1990’s). I think I will be getting stuck into this book over the next few weeks. As I headed back to my building I was thinking about what a great selection of books I’d just picked up.

Links –
Faderman, Lillian (1991) Odd Girls and Twilight Lovers, Columbia University Press
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Odd_Girls_and_Twilight_Lovers

20130509-072828.jpg (source – http://www.booktopia.com.au/odd-girls-and-twilight-lovers-lillian-faderman/prod9780231074889.html)

Advertisements

Femme Identity continued

20 Mar

Following on from my post Femme Identity, I am curious to know the opinions of other lesbians (femme, butch and non-identified) about this gender identity and how this is perceived.

I have a very positive view. And I particularly admire when femme identified lesbians state that their gender identification has little to do with who they attracted to, but rather how they wish to express their sexuality. Personally I think the femme identity is empowered femininity, a form of femininity (expressed through feminine dress, hair and make-up) expressed along with a strong statement regarding sexuality, and an embracing of and power over their own body, image and sexuality, which is feminist.

I find the neo-burlesque and a neo-pin up movements expressions of empowered femininity. These are subcultures, lifestyles and fashions where modern women, feminist women, can embrace their femaleness and express their female (and lesbian) sexuality in a way they want to, and not solely for a male (or female) gaze. I love that these movements embrace fashions, performance and some ideas from by-gone eras, but also incorporate elements of sexual freedom, equality and alternative fashions (such as tattoos, gothic fashion, vintage fashion and fetish fashion).

%d bloggers like this: